Researcher biography

Jason Chin is a Lecturer at the TC Beirne School of Law. He teaches Evidence and Trusts.

Jason holds a PhD in Social Psychology from the University of British Columbia where he was a Killam Scholar and a JD from the University of Toronto. He graduated, cum laude, from the University of Virginia with a BA in Psychology and Economics.

Jason's legal scholarship is guided by his background as a social psychologist. For example, in the area of evidence law, Jason researches the unconscious biases that regularly influence expert opinions. He is also deeply interested in how courts should react to issues concerning the reliability of science. His current work delves into the role of faulty eyewitness identifications in wrongful convictions, and how reliable expert evidence may contribute to eliminating some of those risks. Jason's research has drawn popular attention, and has been featured in the National Post and New York Times.

Jason's research in Equity and Trusts also adopts a psychology and law perspective. He researches dilemmas that arise when the expectations of investors and market participants conflict with the law of trusts, which are often based on antiquated views of human psychology.

Jason also regularly conducts empirical law and psychology research. He is a proponent of open and reproducible scientific methods.

Prior to his academic career, Jason practiced litigation at a large international law firm. He has been called to the bar in both New York and Ontario. His experience in practice continues to inform his legal scholarship by drawing his attention to the pragmatic challenges regularly faced by lawyers.