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As a result of the recent review of the LLB program, a revised program structure for the LLB will commence in 2008. Students who commenced their program prior to 2008 may complete their studies under the programs rules then in force. However, the revised program will impact on pre-2008 students through changes in course numbering, the unit value of some courses, the availability of compulsory courses, and in the range of electives.

All pre-2008 students are strongly encouraged to read through the following information. It summarises the main changes to the program and include important tips for program planning.

Summary of Changes and Tips for Program Planning (LLB)

The main changes to the LLB which will affect pre-2008 students:

  • Criminal Law is currently covered in #3 (LAWS2004 Criminal Law and LAWS2006 Criminal Procedure and Sentencing).  From 2008 this will increase to #4 (LAWS2113 Criminal Law and Procedure A and LAWS2114 Criminal Law and Procedure B).
  • Constitutional Law is currently covered in #3 (LAWS2005 Constitutional Law A and LAWS2007 Constitutional Law B).  From 2008 this will decrease to #2 (LAWS1116 Constitutional Law), but there is a new requirement to complete #2 LAWS1115 Principles of Public Law.
  • Administrative Law is currently covered in #3 (LAWS5018 Administrative Law A and LAWS5020 Administrative Law B).  From 2008 this will decrease to #2 (LAWS2115 Administrative Law), but there is new requirement to complete #2 LAWS1115 Principles of Public Law.
  • Law of Companies & Insolvency is currently covered in #3 (LAWS5017 Law of Companies and LAWS5019 Law of Insolvency).  From 2008 this will decrease to #2 (LAWS4112 Corporate Law).

Tips for pre-2008 students:

  • Follow your recommended study plan!  Students who have followed their recommended study plan will have a smooth transition to the new courses in the new structure.
  • If you are currently enrolled in, or have completed,  an ‘A’ course, make sure you enrol in the ‘B’ course in Semester 2, 2007 e.g. if you are doing LAWS5018 Administrative Law A in Semester 1, make sure you do LAWS5020 Administrative Law B in Semester 2.
  • LAWS2008 Introduction to Legal Theory becomes LAWS4111 Jurisprudence from 2008.  LAWS4111 will be offered in Semester 1, 2008 but after this will not be offered again until 2011 as it is becoming a 4th year course.  If you are due to graduate before 2011 and for some reason have missed taking Introduction to Legal Theory, please note that Semester 2, 2007 and Semester 1, 2008 will be your last chances to take this course.  Please consult the new recommended study plan for your program.  You should take LAWS4111 in the semester listed on the relevant plan.
  • Students will NOT be able to graduate short of the units required for their program.  If a student is #1 short at the end of their program (due to transition), they will be required to take a special #1 research project (LAWS5226 Special Project) to ensure the program units are satisfied, or they can enrol in a #2 elective course and graduate #1 over program unit requirements.
  • Pre-2008 students MUST do LAWS4013 Civil Procedure (new code LAWS5215), LAWS4014 Law of Evidence (new code LAWS5216) and LAWS4017 The Legal Profession (new code LAWS5217) despite these courses being elective courses in the new 2008 structure.
  • Pre-2008 students do not need to concern themselves with the new LAWS1111 Legal Method, LAWS1112 Law and Society, LAWS3115 Law of Remedies and LAWS4113 Structure of the Private Law courses.
  • Most elective courses will now be offered on a biennial basis.  The new elective offering structure is available on the Law School website.

Things to bear in mind for program planning

  • The Law School will cease to offer all old course codes from 2008 except LAWS5019 Law of Insolvency and LAWS5020 Administrative Law B which will be offered in 2008 only.  But, students should make every attempt to complete these 2 courses in 2007.
  • LAWS4017 The Legal Profession (new code LAWS5217)is currently a Semester 2 course.  From 2008 it will become a Semester 1 course.
  • LAWS1116 Constitutional Law and LAWS1115 Principles of Public Law will BOTH be Semester 2 courses.
  • LAWS3010 Equity (currently offered in Semester 1) becomes the new LAWS3114 Law of Trusts B (offered in Semester 2).  Similarly, LAWS3012 Law of Trusts (currently offered in Semester 2) becomes the new LAWS3113 Law of Trusts A (offered in Semester 1).
  • LAWS2008 Introduction to Legal Theory is currently a Semester 2 course.  It will be replaced by LAWS4111 Jurisprudence which will be offered in Semester 1.

Students should refer to the recommended study plan below for the year they commenced their program.  These study plans show the courses that single and dual pre-2008 students should take from 2008 to complete their programs.

Note: Students who up until this point have not been following the recommended study plan for their program may need to seek additional program planning advice.

* As part of the transitional arrangements in 2008 and 2009, it will be necessary for some students to undertake LAWS1115 Principles of Public Law, LAWS1116 Constitutional Law and LAWS2115 Administrative Law other than in the order implied by the listed prerequisites.  Accordingly, for 2008 and 2009, these courses will not presuppose the prior study of the prerequisite courses.  Where necessary, students will be given supplemental material.

LLB

BA/LLB

BBus/LLB

BBusMan/LLB

BCom/LLB

BEcon/LLB

BEnvMan/LLB (Natural Systems & Wildlife)

BEnvMan/LLB (Sustainable Development)

LLB/BInfTech

BJ/LLB

BSc/LLB

Students who are concerned about their program plans as a result of the changes should seek advice by emailing the relevant staff member listed below.  Students who, as a result of the changes, believe they will have an odd number of units (#) in their programs are especially urged to seek advice.

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