Chinese law and global development

A past, present and future analysis

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  • WhenTuesday
    30 November 2021

  • When11am-4pm AEST

  • WhereVirtual event

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Join The University of Queensland and the Centre for Chinese and Comparative Law at the City University of Hong Kong for a virtual seminar analysing Chinese law and its impacts on global order and development.

Our line-up of international speakers will share cutting-edge research and policy-driven analysis of China's recent legal development and reform, which have driven the country's rise as an important regional and global power in recent years – particularly in the areas of trade and investment.

The seminar will be delivered in two key streams, criminal law and international/commercial law, to highlight China’s legal landscape and effects on areas such as criminal justice, constitutional law, economic law, anti-foreign sanctions law and copyright law, along with its contribution and impact on the developmental, social and commercial circumstances of many societies around the world – including Australia.

If you’re interested in Chinese, comparative, international laws and politics – this event is for you!

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Seminar program

Session 1 - Criminal Law

Time Presentation
11:00-11:20
Influences of Criminology on Criminal Law in the West and in Modern China
Professor Jianhong Liu, University of Macau, Hong Kong
 
11:20-11:40

The Operation and Ideology of Social Governance in the Xi Jinping Era
Professor Sue Trevaskes, Griffith University, Australia

11:40-12:00

Three Cases of Non-compliance: Challenges of Trust and Governmental Response Strategies
Professor Bin Liang, Oklahoma State University, United States of America

12:00-12:20

Bureaucratising Criminal Convictions in China
Dr Enshen Li, The University of Queensland, Australia

12:20-1:00 Q&A session
Facilitated by Dr Enshen Li, The University of Queensland, Australia


Session 2 - International/Commercial Law

Time Presentation
2:00-2:20 A Sequential and Hierarchical Approach to Contract Interpretation under Chinese Law: A Critique
Professor Bing Ling, The University of Sydney, Australia
2:20-2:40 Sale of Goods Across the Shenzhen (Sham Chun) River: Legal Comparison, Harmonisation and the Role of the CISG
Professor Qiao Liu, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2:40-3:00 ESG as ESP(olitics): The Political Logic of Environmental, Social, and Governance in China
Professor Jiangyu Wang, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3:00-3:20 The Copyright Crisis of AI Governance in China: Challenges and Solutions
Assistant Professor Tianxiang He, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3:20-3:40

The Informal Interpretation of the Hong Kong Basic Law: A Dialogic Approach
Assoc Professor Shucheng Wang, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

3:40-4:00 Q&A Session
Facilitated by Professor Qiao Liu, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

 

Meet the speakers
 

JIanhong LiuProfessor Jianhong Liu, University of Macau, China

Professor Jianhong Liu is a Distinguished Professor of Faculty of Law at University of Macau. He is the winner of 2016 American Society of Criminology “Freda Adler Distinguished International Scholar Award” and the winner of 2018 Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences' "G. O.W. Mueller Award for Distinguished Contribution to International Criminal Justice" in USA. He is currently the Elected President of the Scientific Commission of the International Society for Criminology (2014-), the elected Chairman of the General Assembly of the Asian Criminological Society (2016-), and a member of the steering committee of Campbell Collaboration’s Crime and Justice Group (2009-). Professor Liu is the Founding and Honorary President of Asian Criminological Society (2009-). 

Sue TrevaskesProfessor Sue Trevaskes, Griffith University, Australia

Susan Trevaskes is Professor of Chinese Studies at Griffith University. Her research has resulted in over 60 publications including the first books in English on criminal courts contemporary China (2007), policing serious crime in China (2010), and the death penalty reform in China (2012). She has published papers on Chinese justice in a number of journals including The China Journal, The British Journal of Criminology, The China Quarterly, and Modern China. Her latest co-edited volumes are The Politics of Law and Stability in China (2014), Legal Reforms and Deprivation of Liberty in Contemporary China (2016) Justice: The China Experience (2017) and The Party and the Law in China: Ideology and Organisation (2021).

Bin LiangProfessor Bin Liang, Oklahoma State University, United States of America

Bin Liang (梁斌, Ph.D./J.D.) is a Professor of Sociology at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of five published books, including ‘The Changing Chinese Legal System, 1978 – Present: Centralization of Power and Rationalization of the Legal System’ (2008) with Routledge, ‘China’s Drug Practices and Policies: Regulating Controlled Substances in a Global Context’ (2009, co-authored) with Ashgate, Jurisprudence (2012, co-edited, in Chinese) with Renmin University of China Press (法学, 人民大学出版社), ‘The Death Penalty in China: Policy, Practice and Reform’ (2016, co-edited) with Columbia University Press, and ‘Chinese Netizens’ Opinions on Death Sentences: An Empirical Examination’ (2021, co-authored) with University of Michigan Press.

Enshen LiDr Enshen Li, The University of Queensland, Australia

Dr Enshen Li is a Senior Lecturer at the TC Beirne School of Law at The University of Queensland. Dr Li's research interests lie in the fields of criminal justice, criminology and socio-legal study with a special focus on criminal justice and punishment in China. Dr Li has published in leading law and criminology journals, including the British Journal of Criminology, Law and Social Inquiry, Social & Legal Studies, Columbia Journal of Asian Law, New Criminal Law Review and Terrorism and Political Violence. He is also the author of "Punishment in Contemporary China: Its Evolution, Development and Change” and the recipient of the Early Career Research Excellence in Research Award for the BEL Faculty at The University of Queensland in 2018. Prior to entering academia, Dr Li practiced criminal law as a defence counsel in Shanghai, China.

Bing LingProfessor Bing Ling, The University of Sydney, Australia

Professor Bing Ling is Professor of Chinese Law at the University of Sydney Law School. Before joining Sydney in 2012 he was a professor and founding member of the Faculty of Law of the Chinese University of Hong Kong from 2005 - 2012. He has also taught at Peking University Law School, University of Michigan Law School and the City University of Hong Kong Law School. He received his LLB degree from Peking University in 1989 and LLM degree from the University of Michigan in 1992. He was awarded a Diploma by the Hague Academy of International Law in 1995. He is the author of books and articles on both Chinese civil and commercial law and international law. He has also served as an expert witness on Chinese law questions in international litigation and arbitration cases.

Professor Qiao LiuProfessor Qiao Liu, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Qiao Liu is currently Professor and Deputy Director of the Centre for Chinese and Comparative Law, School of Law, City University of Hong Kong. He is also a Honorary Professor at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland (Australia) and an Adjunct Chair Professor at the School of Law of Xiamen University (China). He serves as co-Editor-in-Chief of the Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (OUP). He teaches and researches in contract law (both Anglo-Australian and Chinese), comparative Chinese law and commercial law (both domestic and international) and has published in leading law journals including the Modern Law Review, American Journal of Comparative Law and the Cambridge Law Journal. He was a member of a small expert group working with the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) Secretariat on the updating of the Digest on the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

Profile photo of Professor Jiangyu WangProfessor Jiangyu Wang, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Wang Jiangyu is Professor and Director of the Centre for Chinese and Comparative Law (CCCL) at the City University of Hong Kong School of Law. Prior to joining CityU, he held a tenured appointment at the Faculty of Law of the National University of Singapore for more than a decade, where he served as the Director of the Asian Law Institute (ASLI) and was the founding Deputy Director of the Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) of NUS Law. He is presently an Editor-in-Chief of The Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (CJCL) published by Oxford University Press and was a Joint Editor-in-Chief for the Asian Journal of Comparative Law (AsJCL), published by Cambridge University Press. His teaching and research interests include international law and international relations, international economic law, comparative law, company law, securities regulation, and law and development in China. 

Tianxiang HeAssistant Professor Tianxiang He, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Dr. He is an Assistant Professor in the School of Law with the City University of Hong Kong. He is also acting as an Associate Member of IGIR with Maastricht University. Dr. He is the author of the book ‘Copyright and Fan Productivity in China: A Cross-jurisdictional Perspective’. His articles have appeared in top journals such as the American Journal of Comparative Law, the Queen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property, the Journal of the Copyright Society of the USA, Computer Law & Security Review, The University of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy, the Hong Kong Law Journal and Asia Pacific Law Review. Dr. He is currently on the editorial board of the Chinese Journal of Comparative Law (CJCL) published by Oxford University Press.

Shucheng WangAssoc Professor Shucheng Wang, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Shucheng (Peter) Wang is an Associate Professor of Law at City University of Hong Kong. He was a Fulbright Scholar in the US and Clarendon Scholar at Oxford and is the author of four monographs, including most recently “Law as Instrument: Sources of Chinese Law for Authoritarian Legality” (Cambridge University Press 2022, forthcoming), along with over fifty journal articles appearing (and/or forthcoming) in Human Rights Quarterly and Modern China, among others. His research interests include comparative constitutional law, human rights, legal theory, international law, and Chinese and comparative law. As a Principal Investigator, he has been awarded three grants from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong in support of his interdisciplinary research in the fields of law, religion, and society.

 

This event is a partnership between The University of Queensland and the Centre for Chinese and Comparative Law at the City University of Hong Kong

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