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Keynotes

Prof. Alexander Bellamy

Alex Bellamy Alex Bellamy is Director of the Asia Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at The University of Queensland, Australia. He is also Non-Resident Senior Adviser at the International Peace Institute, New York and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. In 2008-9 he served as co-chair of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific Study Group on the Responsibility to Protect and he currently serves as Secretary of the High Level Advisory Panel on the Responsibility to Protect in Southeast Asia, chaired by Dr. Surin Pitsuwan.

Dr Bellamy is co-editor of the Global Responsibility to Protect journal. His recent books include Responsibility to Protect: A Defence (Oxford, 2014), Providing Peacekeepers (with Paul D. Williams) (Oxford, 2013) and Massacres and Morality (Oxford, 2012).

View Professor Bellamy's profile

Prof. Robert Cribb

Prof. Robert Cribb

Professor Robert Cribb is a historian of modern Indonesia, with wider interests in other parts of Asia. He completed his BA at the University of Queensland and his PhD at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. He has held positions at Griffith University, the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Study, the University of Queensland and the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies. His research focusses on the intersection between mass violence and national and political identities. He also writes on environmental politics and historical geography. His latest book, Japanese War Criminals: The Politics of Justice After the Second World War [with Sandra Wilson, Beatrice Trefalt, and Dean Aszkielowicz] will appear in 2017 with Columbia University Press.

Prof. Lyndall Ryan

Prof. Lyndall Ryan

Lyndall Ryan is Conjoint Research Professor in the Centre for the History of Violence at the University of Newcastle, Australia.  Her first book on the Tasmanian Aborigines was published in 1981, with an updated second edition in 1996.  With the title, Aboriginal Tasmanians, the key argument was that the Tasmanian Aborigines had not died out in 1876 or at any other period in history.  In 2002, she was a key target in the Aboriginal history wars which claimed that she had invented frontier massacres of Tasmanian Aborigines during the Black War of the 1820s. Re-reading the sources, she found that the Tasmanian Aborigines were more likely killed in mass killings of five or more, than in ones and twos.  Since then she has focussed on the new field of massacre studies with a special interest in the study of frontier massacre in colonial settler societies. Her most recent books include Tasmanian Aborigines A History since 1803 (2012), and the co-edited collection with Philip G. Dwyer, Theatres of Violence Massacre, Mass Killing and Atrocity throughout History (2012).  She currently holds two Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Grants: (i) frontier violence in Australia 1788-1960 which will include a digital map of Aboriginal massacre sites in eastern Australia; and (ii) violence and intimacy in settler societies on the Anglo-Pacific rim 1830-1930.   She is also completing a comparative study of colonial frontier violence in old and new empires 1780-1830, with Philip Dwyer, Barbara Mann and Nigel Penn.

View Professor Lyndall's profile

William Smith AM

William Smith AM
William Smith AM

William Smith is the Deputy Co-Prosecutor of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC). The ECCC is mandated to bring to trial senior leaders of Democratic Kampuchea and those most responsible for crimes committed under the Khmer Rouge regime between 1975 and 1979. He has held this position since the court was established in 2006. For the preceding 11 years, William worked as a trial attorney and legal officer at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). In 2000, William was seconded to the UN Transitional Authority in East Timor as the Acting District Administrator of Viqueque District. His work has taken him all over the world, including to the Balkans, Rwanda, Senegal and Northern Ireland. He was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for significant service to the law, particularly through international justice tribunals and human rights organizations.

Raised and educated in Adelaide, South Australia, William joined the South Australian Police Force where he worked for seven years, primarily as a police prosecutor. Following this, he studied law and arts at Adelaide University, graduating in 1993 while also working for the Office of Director of Public Prosecutions. William worked as a barrister and solicitor in Adelaide before joining the ICTY in 1996. In 1999, he received a Masters in International Law from Leiden University, the Netherlands. 

Dr Phoebe Wynn-Pope

Dr Phoebe Wynn-Pope

Director, IHL and Movement Relations, Australian Red Cross

Phoebe has 25 years experience in the humanitarian sector and has worked in complex humanitarian emergencies and conflict zones throughout Africa, the Middle East and Europe. This field work included working in Iran responding to the humanitarian impacts of the first Gulf War, and leading a humanitarian response to the Somali famine.

Phoebe also established programmes in Bosnia Herzegovina during the armed conflict and worked in the Great Lakes region as part of the humanitarian response to the Rwandan genocide. Following this experience Phoebe returned to Australia to undertake a PhD in international law focussing on the role of the international community when confronting war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

Previously Phoebe was a Principal Executive of Fundraising and Communications and from 1996-2002 Phoebe was the Commonwealth representative on the National Council for the Centenary of Federation. In this role she was Convenor of the Communications Committee and chaired the organising Committee of the Yeperenye Festival, the largest gathering of Aboriginal peoples since Federation.

Most recently, Phoebe was a founding Director of the Humanitarian Advisory group where her work focussed on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, the use of information technology for the prevention of mass atrocity crimes, as well as researching policy development for businesses operating in fragile and conflict affected states.