• FBN v Director-General, Department of Justice and Attorney-General [2020] QCAT 260

    This case concerned an application for review of the respondent’s decision to issue a negative blue card notice after the applicant was convicted of offences in relation to the possession of cannabis.
  • Fernwood Womens Health Clubs (Australia) Pty Ltd [2021] QCAT 164

    The applicant sought an exemption under the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (Qld) to operate their fitness clubs exclusively for female members, and to be run exclusively by female staff. The Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) was considered in reference to whether granting this exemption placed a reasonable and demonstrably justifiable limit on the right to recognition and equality before the law.
  • FGH v Director-General, Department of Justice and Attorney-General [2020] QCAT 401

    This case concerned an application for review of the respondent’s decision to issue a negative blue card notice to the applicant, FGH.
  • FH [2020] QCAT 482

    This case concerned an application for the appointment of the Public Guardian to make decisions regarding legal matters for FH. Member Traves recognised that the Tribunal was a public entity acting in an administrative capacity within the meaning of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) and was required to consider the Act when making such an order.
  • Flowers v State of New South Wales [2019] NSWSC 1467

    Human rights breaches by the NSW Police were argued by the plaintiff, but the court considered the argument to be irrelevant to the case.
  • GCS [2020] QCAT 206

    The Tribunal considered whether there was a need to appoint a guardian and administrator for GCS, an 89 year-old woman with impaired capacity. The Tribunal had regard to the interpretation provisions of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) (s 48), GCS’s property rights (s 24), freedom of movement (s 19), and right to privacy (s 45) when making its decision to appoint the Public Guardian to manage GCS’s affairs.
  • Gilbert v Metro North Hospital Health Service & Ors [2020] QIRC 084

    The applicant relied upon the right to peaceful assembly and freedom of association contained within section 22 of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) in seeking declaratory relief against the respondents. There was, however, no in-depth analysis of this provision provided in the Commission’s decision.
  • Gilbert v Metro North Hospital Health Service & Ors [2021] QIRC 255

    The applicant sought declarations that the respondents had acted unlawfully under section 58 of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) by acting in a way that was incompatible with her right to freedom of expression (sections 21) and freedom of association (section 22(2)), and by failing to give proper consideration to her human rights. The Commission dismissed the application, on the basis that limitations were reasonable and demonstrably justifiable.
  • Hansen v State of Queensland (Department of Environment and Science) [2021] QIRC 162

    The appellant sought a review of the respondent’s decision not to convert his employment to a higher classification level. The appellant submitted to the Commission that he should have been treated by the respondent in accordance with the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld). There was no substantive discussion of human rights or the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) in the reasons.
  • HAP v Director-General, Department of Justice and Attorney-General [2020] QCAT 273

    This case concerned an administrative review of the respondent’s decision to issue a negative blue card notice after the applicant was convicted of four breaches of the Weapons Act 1900 (Qld).

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Disclaimer

These case notes are intended to provide summarised general information only. They do not constitute legal advice and should not be relied on as such.  If the subject matter of any case note relates to a transaction or matter of particular concern, you should seek your own independent formal legal advice from an admitted legal practitioner.  Please note, UQ does not offer legal services to the public.