• RE and RL v Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women [2020] QCAT 151

    Foster parents applied to the Tribunal to review decisions made by the Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women to remove two children from their care and cancel their certificate of approval as foster carers. The Tribunal had regard to the applicants’ right to recognition and equality before the law but held that the right to protection of families did not apply as foster carers do not constitute “family” for the purpose of s 26 of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld). The protection of children under s 26(2) of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld), was also considered in relation to the Child Protection Act 1999 (Qld).
  • Re JMT [2020] QSC 72

    This case concerned an application for bail for charges of murder and grievous bodily harm. The court briefly mentioned the rights of detained persons and the obligations the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) casts on the three branches of government, but there was no in-depth discussion as a human rights argument was not made by the applicant.
  • REB v Director-General, Department of Justice and Attorney-General [2020] QCAT 312

    This case concerned an application for review of the respondent’s decision to issue a negative blue card notice to the applicant, REB, due to a previous conviction for contravening a Protection Order naming his former partner and her children.
  • River Glen Haven Over 50s Village [2021] QCAT 26

    This case concerned age discrimination pertaining to an application for an exemption from section 127 of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (Qld). The company in question had in its trading name ‘over 50s village’ which was found to contravene this section. Given this finding, the Tribunal did not engage in an analysis of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) despite submissions by the Queensland Human Rights Commission.
  • RTM v The Queen [2020] QDC 93

    The court considered an application for a no-jury trial and whether it is in the interests of justice for the trial to proceed on a judge alone basis. The right to be tried without unreasonable delay (Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) s 32(2)(c)) was considered relevant, but there was no substantive discussion of the right or its application.
  • Schimke v State of Queensland (Queensland Fire and Emergency Services) [2020] QIRC 205

    The appellant sought to challenge the outcome of a review of her employment status. Contained within the relevant policy directive was a provision acknowledging the requirement of public entities to make decisions that are compatible with human rights. There was no in-depth analysis of the provision in the directive or the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) generally. 
  • SF v Department of Education [2021] QCAT 10

    This case concerned an application for review of the Department of Education’s decision to refuse SF’s application to home school her child on the basis that they require an address to be provided. The Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) was relevant in assessing whether the Department of Education’s interpretation of the procedural requirements and the terms of the application form to home school were compatible with SF and her children’s right to recognition and equality before the law (section 15), right to privacy and reputation (section 25), right to protection of families and children (section 26), and right to education (section 36).    
  • SM v Director-General, Department of Justice and Attorney-General [2021] QCAT 116

    This case concerned an application for review of the respondent’s decision to issue a negative blue card notice to the applicant, SM. The Tribunal found that the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) did not apply, as the proceedings began before the commencement of the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld).
  • Spedding Estates Pty Ltd ATF The Spedding Family Trust v Cotterill & Downie [2022] QCATA 3

    This case involved an appeal of the Tribunal’s decision that a contract between the two parties was frustrated as a result of COVID-19 government restrictions. The Tribunal recognised that it was bound by the Human Rights Act 2019 (Qld) and that a person has a right to have a civil proceeding decided by a court or tribunal after a fair and public hearing (section 31).
  • SSJ v Director-General, Department of Justice and Attorney-General [2020] QCAT 252

    The applicant in this case applied for an administrative review of a decision to issue a negative blue card notice. The Tribunal was tasked with determining whether his case was an “exceptional case” in which it was not in the best interests of children for the applicant to hold a blue card.

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Please contact our group with any enquiries at humanrights@uq.edu.au.

Disclaimer

These case notes are intended to provide summarised general information only. They do not constitute legal advice and should not be relied on as such.  If the subject matter of any case note relates to a transaction or matter of particular concern, you should seek your own independent formal legal advice from an admitted legal practitioner.  Please note, UQ does not offer legal services to the public.